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Atomised by Michel Houellebecq


Two dysfunctional brothers have little in common except the blood in their veins. The main protagonist is a brilliant and idealistic molecular biologist and although this is fiction is based on a real character. He champions a highly controversial theory  that the human race will become extinct. His brother in contrast seems base and shallow.

The Family on Paradise Pier by Dermot Bolger


An Irish Protestant are caught up in changing times. They are outsiders no matter where they go. There desperate attempts at achieving acceptance prove futile.

Brilliantly written by the master writer.

Stoner by John Williams


There is something magnetic about Stoner. His is a sad story of a doomed destiny.

Brilliantly written and a true classic.

Tweet from @CogNeuroNews


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What shapes a child’s sense of humor? New blog post about work by Jessica Black, Allan Reiss, Pascal Vrticka #cns2014 http://www.cogneurosociety.org/children_humor_cns2014/

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Tweet from @TaraSwart


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“@MITSloanExecEd: Can you consciously uncouple from a Fixed mindset towards a Growth mindset? http://ow.ly/vrw3k ” #neuroscience

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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors


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“Imitating nature is not a new idea. When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and givesMorfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat.”

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Tweet from @kenvansom


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Read about what we do and win a day at the GSK Human Performance Lab http://www.healthyformen.com/win-a-day-at-gsk-human-performance-lab/

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Mapping and manipulating the brain at scale – Jeremy Freeman


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The behavior of an animal reflects computations across its entire nervous system, involving the coordinated activity of thousands of neurons within and across multiple brain areas. New technologies for imaging the nervous system allow us to monitor neural function at unprecedented scales. But the data sets are quickly outpacing the capabilities of ordinary analytical approaches. They are large (one terabyte or more per hour), complex, and high-dimensional, and we want to understand their structure as it evolves over both space and time.

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